Journal article

Movement-based interventions for preschool-age children with, or at risk of, motor impairment: a systematic review

Kate L Cameron, Reem A Albesher, Jennifer L McGinley, Kim Allison, Jeanie LY Cheong, Alicia J Spittle

Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology | WILEY | Published : 2019

Abstract

AIM: To explore the efficacy of movement-based interventions to improve motor skills in preschool-age children with, or at risk of, motor impairment, including those with a diagnosis of cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorder, and developmental coordination disorder. METHOD: Relevant electronic databases were searched for randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials. Outcomes were classified using domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: Children & Youth version. Quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Effect sizes were calculated using Cohen's d. RESUL..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (Centre of Research Excellence 1060733 and 1153176; Career Development Fellowship 1141354 to JLYC; Career Development Fellowship 1108714 to AJS), and the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. KLC's PhD candidature was supported by The Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship and the Centre of Research Excellence in Newborn Medicine. RAA's PhD candidature was supported by a Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University Scholarship and the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Newborn Medicine. The funding sources had no role in the study design; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit the paper for publication. The authors have stated that they had no interest that could be perceived as posing a conflict or bias.