Journal article

Mode of delivery and pregnancy outcomes in preterm birth: a secondary analysis of the WHO Global and Multi-country Surveys

Yen Luong Thanh Bao, Pisake Lumbiganon, Porjai Pattanittum, Malinee Laopaiboon, Joshua P Vogel, Olufemi T Oladapo, Cynthia Pileggi-Castro, Rintaro Mori, Kapila Jayaratne, Zahida Qureshi, Joa Souza

Scientific Reports | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

Many studies have been conducted to examine whether Caesarean Section (CS) or vaginal birth (VB) was optimal for better maternal and neonatal outcomes in preterm births. However, findings remain unclear. Therefore, this secondary analysis of World Health Organization Global Survey (GS) and Multi-country Survey (MCS) databases was conducted to investigate outcomes of preterm birth by mode of delivery. Our sample were women with singleton neonates (15,471 of 237 facilities from 21 countries in GS; and 15,053 of 239 facilities from 21 countries in MCS) delivered between 22 and <37 weeks of gestation. We assessed association between mode of delivery and pregnancy outcomes in singleton preterm bi..

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Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

We thank all members of the WHO Global Survey on Maternal and Perinatal Health Research Network and the WHO Multi-Country Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health Research Network, including regional and country coordinators, data collection coordinators, facility coordinators, data collectors, and all staff of the participating facilities who made the surveys possible. Our thanks are also expressed to Dr. Cameron Hurst for his helpful suggestions in data analysis. We would also like to thank the Thailand Research Fund (Distinguished Professor Award) for supporting this secondary analysis. This article represents the views of the named authors only, and does not represent the views of the World Health Organization. The WHO Global Survey on Maternal and Perinatal Health was financially supported by the UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction; WHO; the Governments of China, India, and Japan; and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The WHO Multi-Country Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health was financially supported by the UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction; WHO; USAID; the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan; and Gynuity Health Projects.