Journal article

Working memory training and brain structure and function in extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight children

Claire E Kelly, Deanne K Thompson, Jian Chen, Elisha K Josev, Leona Pascoe, Megan M Spencer-Smith, Chris Adamson, Chiara Nosarti, Susan Gathercole, Gehan Roberts, Katherine J Lee, Lex W Doyle, Marc L Seal, Peter J Anderson

Human Brain Mapping | WILEY | Published : 2019

Abstract

This study in children born extremely preterm (EP; <28 weeks' gestational age) or extremely low birth weight (ELBW; <1,000 g) investigated whether adaptive working memory training using Cogmed® is associated with structural and/or functional brain changes compared with a placebo program. Ninety-one EP/ELBW children were recruited at a mean (standard deviation) age of 7.8 (0.4) years. Children were randomly allocated to Cogmed or placebo (45-min sessions, 5 days a week over 5-7 weeks). A subset had usable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data pretraining and 2 weeks posttraining (structural, n = 48; diffusion, n = 43; task-based functional, n = 18). Statistical analyses examined whether corti..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC: Centre of Research Excellence in Newborn Medicine)


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was conducted within the Developmental Imaging and Victorian Infant Brain Studies research groups at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, and the Children's MRI Centre at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria. We thank all participating children and families who made this research possible. We thank the Royal Children's Hospital Medical Imaging staff for their assistance and expertise in the collection of the MRI data included in this study. This study was supported by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, the Royal Children's Hospital, The Royal Children's Hospital Foundation, the Department of Paediatrics at The University of Melbourne, Monash University and the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. This study was also supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC: Project Grant 1028422, Centre of Research Excellence in Newborn Medicine [1060733], Program Grant 606789, Senior Research Fellowship 1081288 and Career Development Fellowships 1085754 and 1127984). The funding sources had no role in the design, data collection, analysis, interpretation or writing of the study, or in the decision to submit it for publication.