Journal article

Preoperative beta-Blockade with Propranolol Reduces Biomarkers of Metastasis in Breast Cancer: A Phase II Randomized Trial

Jonathan G Hiller, Steven W Cole, Elizabeth M Crone, David J Byrne, David M Shackleford, Jia-Min B Pang, Michael A Henderson, Sophie S Nightingale, Kwok M Ho, Paul S Myles, Stephen Fox, Bernhard Riedel, Erica K Sloan

CLINICAL CANCER RESEARCH | AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH | Published : 2020

Abstract

PURPOSE: The majority of deaths from breast cancer occur following the development of metastatic disease, a process inhibited by β-blockers in preclinical studies. This phase II randomized controlled trial evaluated the effect of preoperative β-blockade with propranolol on biomarkers of metastatic potential and the immune cell profile within the primary tumor of patients with breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this triple-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, 60 patients were randomly assigned to receive an escalating dose of oral propranolol (n = 30; 80-160 mg daily) or placebo (n = 30) for 7 days prior to surgery. The primary endpoint investigated the effect of propranolol on prome..

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Grants

Awarded by NCI


Awarded by Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Institute of Aging


Awarded by NHMRC Practitioner Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to Drs David Gyorki, Cathie Poliness, and David Speakman for assistance with patient recruitment; Dr Alexander Ziegler for assistance with soluble cytokine analysis; and Aeson Chang for constructive discussion. The work of the authors was supported by the NCI Contract No. HHSN261200800001E, and the NCI Network on Biobehavioral Pathways in Cancer, the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (project grant 16/004), National Health and Medical Research Council 1147498, the National Institute of Aging P30 AG017265, Perpetual Trustees IMPACT Philanthropic 2016 Research Grant, and The David and Lorelle Skewes Foundation. P.S. Myles was supported by an NHMRC Practitioner Fellowship (ID1135937).