Journal article

Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and familial breast cancer risk: findings from the Prospective Family Study Cohort (ProF-SC)

Nur Zeinomar, Julia A Knight, Jeanine M Genkinger, Kelly-Anne Phillips, Mary B Daly, Roger L Milne, Gillian S Dite, Rebecca D Kehm, Yuyan Liao, Melissa C Southey, Wendy K Chung, Graham G Giles, Sue-Anne McLachlan, Michael L Friedlander, Prue C Weideman, Gord Glendon, Stephanie Nesci, Irene L Andrulis, Saundra S Buys, Esther M John Show all

Breast Cancer Research | BMC | Published : 2019

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (BC), but it is unclear whether these associations vary by a woman's familial BC risk. METHODS: Using the Prospective Family Study Cohort, we evaluated associations between alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and BC risk. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazard models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We examined whether associations were modified by familial risk profile (FRP), defined as the 1-year incidence of BC predicted by Breast Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA), a pedigree-based algorithm..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute of Health USA


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Cancer Australia


Awarded by USA National Cancer Institute


Awarded by Australian National Breast Cancer Foundation


Awarded by National Breast Cancer Foundation (Australia)


Awarded by National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Cancer Institute, Cancer Epidemiology Training Grant


Awarded by NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), TL1 Training Program


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Institute of Health USA (grant number 1RO1CA159868). The ABCFR was supported in Australia by the National Health and Medical Research Council, the New South Wales Cancer Council, the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, the Victorian Breast Cancer Research Consortium, Cancer Australia, and the National Breast Cancer Foundation. The six sites of the Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) were supported by grant UM1 CA164920 from the USA National Cancer Institute. The content of this manuscript does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the National Cancer Institute or any of the collaborating centers in the BCFR, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the US Government or the BCFR. This work was supported by grants to kConFab and the kConFab Follow-Up Study from the Cancer Australia (grant number 809195); the Australian National Breast Cancer Foundation (grant number IF 17 kConFab); the National Health and Medical Research Council (grant numbers 454508, 288704, 145684); the National Institute of Health USA (grant number 1RO1CA159868); the Queensland Cancer Fund; the Cancer Councils of New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, and South Australia; and the Cancer Foundation of Western Australia (grant numbers not applicable). KAP is a National Breast Cancer Foundation (Australia) Practitioner Fellow (grant number PRAC-17-004). RDK is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Cancer Institute, Cancer Epidemiology Training Grant (grant number T32-CA009529). NZ is supported by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), TL1 Training Program (grant number TL1TR001875).