Journal article

How to Notice Kaleidoscopic Legal Places: Lessons From a Mural, a Street in Redfern, and Walking the City on Aboriginal Country

Olivia Barr

LAW CULTURE AND THE HUMANITIES | SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD | Published : 2019

Abstract

What happens when we walk past a faded mural? What changes when that mural is finally restored? As we place our feet on the ground, and brush past a painted brick wall, is it possible to see, feel, or listen to law and its stories told, retold, heard, or not heard? Perhaps, but this requires some quite challenging conceptual shifts in how we experience and understand the materialization of law, and its locations, especially when multiple laws inhabit the same place. My argument is that different types of law inhabit physical spaces differently, whether state, federal, local, or Aboriginal. Sometimes, in fact often, different laws simultaneously inhabit the same place, as in the case of a mur..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

This research was partly funded by Melbourne Law School's Indigenous Research Grant Scheme for a grant project called "Country is in the City too: Restoring Public Aboriginal Law through Public Art."