Journal article

Imaging suicidal thoughts and behaviors: a comprehensive review of 2 decades of neuroimaging studies

Lianne Schmaal, Anne-Laura van Harmelen, Vasiliki Chatzi, Elizabeth TC Lippard, Yara J Toenders, Lynnette A Averill, Carolyn M Mazure, Hilary P Blumberg

MOLECULAR PSYCHIATRY | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2020

Abstract

Identifying brain alterations that contribute to suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs) are important to develop more targeted and effective strategies to prevent suicide. In the last decade, and especially in the last 5 years, there has been exponential growth in the number of neuroimaging studies reporting structural and functional brain circuitry correlates of STBs. Within this narrative review, we conducted a comprehensive review of neuroimaging studies of STBs published to date and summarize the progress achieved on elucidating neurobiological substrates of STBs, with a focus on converging findings across studies. We review neuroimaging evidence across differing mental disorders for str..

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Grants

Awarded by MQ Brighter Futures Award


Awarded by National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the MQ Brighter Futures Award MQBFC/2 (ALvH, HPB, and LS), by the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01MH117601 (LS), RC1MH088366 (HPB), R01MH113230 (HPB), R61MH111929 (HPB), T32MH014276 (ETCL), and T32DA022975 (ETCL). LS is supported by a NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (1140764). ALvH is supported by a Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Fellowship (DH15017), and an MRC MRF emerging leaders award. LAA is supported by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Brain and Behavior Foundation/NARSAD, Robert E. Leet and Clara M. Guthrie Patterson Trust, and Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for PTSD and a CSR&D CDA2. HPB is supported by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, International Bipolar Foundation and For the Love of Travis Foundation. CMM and HPB are supported by Women's Health Research at Yale and Women's Health Access Matters.