Journal article

Differential impact of malaria control interventions on P. falciparum and P. vivax infections in young Papua New Guinean children

Maria Ome-Kaius, Johanna Helena Kattenberg, Sophie Zaloumis, Matthew Siba, Benson Kiniboro, Shadrach Jally, Zahra Razook, Daisy Mantila, Desmond Sui, Jason Ginny, Anna Rosanas-Urgell, Stephan Karl, Thomas Obadia, Alyssa Barry, Stephen J Rogerson, Moses Laman, Daniel Tisch, Ingrid Felger, James W Kazura, Ivo Mueller Show all

BMC Medicine | BMC | Published : 2019

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: As malaria transmission declines, understanding the differential impact of intensified control on Plasmodium falciparum relative to Plasmodium vivax and identifying key drivers of ongoing transmission is essential to guide future interventions. METHODS: Three longitudinal child cohorts were conducted in Papua New Guinea before (2006/2007), during (2008) and after scale-up of control interventions (2013). In each cohort, children aged 1-5 years were actively monitored for infection and illness. Incidence of malaria episodes, molecular force of blood-stage infections (molFOB) and population-averaged prevalence of infections were compared across the cohorts to investigate the impa..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by Swiss National Science Foundation


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases through Southwest Pacific International Centre of Excellence in Malaria Research


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

The 2006 cohort was funded in part by National Institutes of Health (AI063135, AI-46919, and TW007872), the Swiss National Science Foundation (grant no. 31003A-112196), the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (Grant no. 516735). The 2008 cohort received funding support from the Cellex Foundation, Barcelona, Spain. The 2013 cohort was funded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases through Southwest Pacific International Centre of Excellence in Malaria Research (grant U19 AI089686) and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation through the TransEPI consortium. MOK is supported by an Australian Awards DFAT Scholarship through University of Melbourne. LJR was supported by NHMRC Early Career Research Fellowship (GNT1016443) to conduct the 2013 cohort and is currently supported by NHMRC Career Development Fellowship Level 2 (GNT1161627). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript.