Journal article

Sustained Weight Loss and Risk of Breast Cancer in Women 50 Years and Older: A Pooled Analysis of Prospective Data

Lauren R Teras, Alpa Patel, Molin Wang, Shiaw-Shyuan Yaun, Kristin Anderson, Roderick Brathwaite, Bette J Caan, Yu Chen, Avonne E Connor, A Heather Eliassen, Susan M Gapstur, Mia M Gaudet, Jeanine M Genkinger, Graham G Giles, I-Min Lee, Roger L Milne, Kim Robien, Norie Sawada, Howard D Sesso, Meir J Stampfer Show all

JNCI-JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE | OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Excess body weight is an established cause of postmenopausal breast cancer, but it is unknown if weight loss reduces risk. METHODS: Associations between weight change and risk of breast cancer were examined among women aged 50 years and older in the Pooling Project of Prospective Studies of Diet and Cancer. In 10 cohorts, weight assessed on three surveys was used to examine weight change patterns over approximately 10 years (interval 1 median = 5.2 years; interval 2 median = 4.0 years). Sustained weight loss was defined as no less than 2 kg lost in interval 1 that was not regained in interval 2. Among 180 885 women, 6930 invasive breast cancers were identified during follow-up. R..

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Grants

Awarded by National Cancer Institute (NCI)


Awarded by NCI


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services


Awarded by University of Arizona



Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by grants from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation and National Cancer Institute (NCI) CA55075. The American Cancer Society funds the creation, maintenance, and updating of the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II) Nutrition cohort. The Iowa Women's Health Study was supported by NCI R01 CA39742. The Japan Public Health Centerbased Study Cohort I and II were supported by the National Cancer Center Research and Development Fund (since 2011) and a Grant-in-Aid for Cancer Research from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan (from 1989 to 2010). The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (MCCS) cohort recruitment was funded by VicHealth and Cancer Council Victoria. The MCCS was further supported by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council grants 209057 and 396414 and by infrastructure provided by Cancer Council Victoria. The Nurses' Health Study (NHS) is supported by NCI UM1 CA186107 and P01 CA87969. The New York University Women's Health Study is supported by National Institutes of Health UM1 CA182934 and center grants P30 CA016087 and P30 ES000260.The WHI program is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services through contracts HHSN2682 01600018C, HHSN268201600001C, HHSN268201600002C, HHSN 268201600003C, and HHSN268201600004C. CT was funded by University of Arizona CCSG P30 CA23074. The Women's Health Study is supported by grants CA047988, CA182913, HL043851, HL080467, and HL099355.