Journal article

Temporal development of the oral microbiome and prediction of early childhood caries

SG Dashper, HL Mitchell, K-A Le Cao, L Carpenter, MG Gussy, H Calache, SL Gladman, DM Bulach, B Hoffmann, D Catmull, S Pruilh, S Johnson, L Gibbs, E Amezdroz, U Bhatnagar, T Seemann, G Mnatzaganian, DJ Manton, EC Reynolds

Scientific Reports | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

Human microbiomes are predicted to assemble in a reproducible and ordered manner yet there is limited knowledge on the development of the complex bacterial communities that constitute the oral microbiome. The oral microbiome plays major roles in many oral diseases including early childhood caries (ECC), which afflicts up to 70% of children in some countries. Saliva contains oral bacteria that are indicative of the whole oral microbiome and may have the ability to reflect the dysbiosis in supragingival plaque communities that initiates the clinical manifestations of ECC. The aim of this study was to determine the assembly of the oral microbiome during the first four years of life and compare ..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation and Science Grant through the Oral Health Cooperative Research Centre


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge all the families who have given up time to be involved in the cohort, the Maternal and Child Health Nurses and administration staff who assisted with recruitment. We also acknowledge Dr. Andrea de Silva as well as the project staff who have been involved in the cohort. This research was supported by: The National Health and Medical Research Council (Primary Health Care Project Grant 425829, Career Development Fellowship 1087415 to KALC); Dental Health Services Victoria; Financial Markets Foundation for Children; Jack Brockhoff Foundation; La Trobe University, the Victorian Government Department for Education and Training and the Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation and Science Grant ID 20080108 through the Oral Health Cooperative Research Centre. The authors dedicate this paper to the memory of Professor Elizabeth Waters whose leadership, vision and vitality will never be forgotten.