Journal article

Use of professional-mode flash glucose monitoring, at 3-month intervals, in adults with type 2 diabetes in general practice (GP-OSMOTIC): a pragmatic, open-labe 12-month, randomised controlled trial

John Furler, David O'Neal, Jane Speight, Irene Blackberry, Jo-Anne Manski-Nankervis, Sharmala Thuraisingam, Katie de La Rue, Louise Ginnivan, Rebecca Doyle, Elizabeth Holmes-Truscott, Kamlesh Khunti, Kim Dalziel, Jason Chiang, Ralph Audehm, Mark Kennedy, Malcolm Clark, Alicia Jenkins, Amelia J Lake, Andrzej S Januszewski, Max Catchpool Show all

The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology | ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Continuous glucose monitoring, either real-time (personal) or retrospective (professional mode), can identify day-to-day glucose profiles to guide management decisions for people with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to examine the effects of professional-mode flash glucose monitoring, done at 3-month intervals, in adults with type 2 diabetes in general practice. METHODS: We did a pragmatic, two-arm, open label, 12-month, individually randomised controlled trial (GP-OSMOTIC) in 25 general practices in Victoria, Australia. Eligible participants were adults aged 18-80 years, with type 2 diabetes diagnosed for at least 1 year and HbA1c at least 5·5 mmol/mol (0·5%) above their target in the..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, Sanofi Australia, and Abbott Diabetes Care.This work was supported by a Project Grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (ID APP1104241). Additional funding was provided by Sanofi Australia. In-kind support (Flash Libre Pro reader devices, sensors, and software) was provided by Abbott Diabetes Care. JF was supported by an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship and a Translating Research into Practice Fellowship. AJ is supported by an NHMRC Practitioner Fellowship and is a Sydney Medical School Foundation Fellow. JS, EH-T, and AJL are supported by core funding to the Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes from Diabetes Victoria and Deakin University. KK acknowledges support from the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care-East Midlands (NIHR CLAHRC-EM) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre.