Journal article

Preventive Pharmacotherapy for Cardiovascular Disease: A Modelling Study Considering Health Gain, Costs, and Cost-Effectiveness when Stratifying by Absolute Risk

Nhung Nghiem, Josh Knight, Anja Mizdrak, Tony Blakely, Nick Wilson

Scientific Reports | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death internationally. We aimed to model the impact of CVD preventive double therapy (a statin and anti-hypertensive) by clinician-assessed absolute risk level. An established and validated multi-state life-table model for the national New Zealand (NZ) population was adapted. The new version of the model specifically considered the 60-64-year-old male population which was stratified by risk using a published NZ-specific CVD risk equation. The intervention period of treatment was for five years, but a lifetime horizon was used for measuring benefits and costs (a five-year horizon was also implemented). We found that for this group offering ..

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Grants

Awarded by Health Research Council


Awarded by Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research, Australian Research Council (CEPAR)


Awarded by Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE)


Awarded by Health Research Council of New Zealand


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors thank Professor Rod Jackson and Dr. Romana Pylypchuk at the University of Auckland for their work on the PREDICT model and for data sharing. The PREDICT research project at the University of Auckland was supported by the Health Research Council (grants 03/183 and 08/121). Work on the synthetic population development by JK was supported by a PhD Scholarship associated with HRC support for the PREDICT work and the Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research, Australian Research Council (CEPAR) (CE170100005). The authors also thank: Professor Philip Clarke (Oxford University) and Dr. Wing Cheuk Chan of Counties Manukau District Health Board for helpful comments on the parameters and modelling, along with BODE<SUP>3</SUP> colleagues who helped develop the initial TC-MSLT Model (Dr. Cristina Cleghorn, Dr. Giorgi Kvizhinadze, Dr. Linda Cobiac and June Atkinson). This modelling work was funded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) (grant: UOOX1406), and supported by additional modelling development work funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand (grants: 10/248 and 16/443).