Journal article

Moral Distress in Nephrology: Perceived Barriers to Ethical Clinical Care

Kathryn Ducharlet, Jennifer Philip, Hilton Gock, Mark Brown, Samantha L Gelfand, Elizabeth A Josland, Frank Brennan

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF KIDNEY DISEASES | W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC | Published : 2020

Abstract

Moral distress occurs when individuals are unable to act in accordance with what they believe to be ethically correct or just. It results from a discrepancy between a clinician's perception of "the right thing to do" and what is actually happening and is perpetuated by perceived constraints that limit the individual from speaking up or enacting change. Moral distress is reported by many clinicians in caring for patients with serious illness, including chronic kidney disease and kidney failure. If left unidentified, unexpressed, or unaddressed, moral distress may cause burnout, exhaustion, detachment, and ineffectiveness. At an extreme, moral distress may lead to a desire to abandon the speci..

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Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

Some of the data discussed in this article was sourced from a study, "Understanding renal clinicians' perspectives of end of life care, palliative care and supportive care," that was partially funded by a Safer Care Victoria Renal Clinical Network project grant (Victorian Government, Department of Health and Human Services, Australia). The funders did not have any involvement in the interpretation of data, writing the report, or decision making.