Journal article

Locally Acquired Human Infection with Swine-Origin Influenza A(H3N2) Variant Virus, Australia, 2018

Yi-Mo Deng, Frank YK Wong, Natalie Spirason, Matthew Kaye, Rebecca Beazley, Miguel L Grau, Songhua Shan, Vittoria Stevens, Kanta Subbarao, Sheena Sullivan, Ian G Barr, Vijaykrishna Dhanasekaran

Emerging Infectious Diseases | CENTERS DISEASE CONTROL & PREVENTION | Published : 2020

Abstract

In 2018, a 15-year-old female adolescent in Australia was infected with swine influenza A(H3N2) variant virus. The virus contained hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes derived from 1990s-like human seasonal viruses and internal protein genes from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, highlighting the potential risk that swine influenza A virus poses to human health in Australia.

Grants

Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services


Funding Acknowledgements

The Melbourne WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza is supported by the Australian Government Department of Health, and the Australian Animal Health Laboratories facility is supported by the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources and the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy. V.D. and M.G. are supported by contract HHSN272201400006C from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services.