Journal article

Self-Assembly of a Metal-Phenolic Sorbent for Broad-Spectrum Metal Sequestration

Md Arifur Rahim, Gan Lin, Pietro Pacchin Tomanin, Yi Ju, Anders Barlow, Mattias Bjornmalm, Frank Caruso

ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces | AMER CHEMICAL SOC | Published : 2020

Abstract

Metal contamination of water bodies from industrial effluents presents a global threat to the aquatic ecosystem. To address this challenge, metal sequestration via adsorption onto solid media has been explored extensively. However, existing sorbent systems typically involve energy-intensive syntheses and are applicable to a limited range of metals. Herein, a sorbent system derived from physically cross-linked polyphenolic networks using tannic acid and ZrIV ions has been explored for high-affinity, broad-spectrum metal sequestration. The network formation step (gelation) of the sorbent is complete within 3 min and requires no special apparatus. The key to this system design is the formation ..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology


Awarded by ARC


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was conducted and funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology (Project Number CE140100036) and an ARC Discovery Project (DP170103331). F.C. acknowledges the award of a National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Principal Research Fellowship (GNT1135806). This work was performed in part at the Materials Characterisation and Fabrication Platform (MCFP) at The University of Melbourne and the Victorian Node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility. The authors acknowledge the use of facilities within the Monash X-ray Platform and Dr. Andrew Mitchell (MCFP, The University of Melbourne) for the helpful discussions regarding the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry studies.