Journal article

Probability of major depression diagnostic classification based on the SCID, CIDI and MINI diagnostic interviews controlling for Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale - Depression subscale scores: An individual participant data meta-analysis of 73 primary studies

Yin Wu, Brooke Levis, Ying Sun, Ankur Krishnan, Chen He, Kira E Riehm, Danielle B Rice, Marleine Azar, Xin Wei Yan, Dipika Neupane, Parash Mani Bhandari, Mahrukh Imran, Matthew J Chiovitti, Nazanin Saadat, Jill T Boruff, Pim Cuijpers, Simon Gilbody, Dean McMillan, John PA Ioannidis, Lorie A Kloda Show all

JOURNAL OF PSYCHOSOMATIC RESEARCH | PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Two previous individual participant data meta-analyses (IPDMAs) found that different diagnostic interviews classify different proportions of people as having major depression overall or by symptom levels. We compared the odds of major depression classification across diagnostic interviews among studies that administered the Depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D). METHODS: Data accrued for an IPDMA on HADS-D diagnostic accuracy were analysed. We fit binomial generalized linear mixed models to compare odds of major depression classification for the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID), Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), an..

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Grants

Awarded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)


Awarded by Research Concil of Lithuania


Awarded by National Science Council, Taiwan


Awarded by commission "Salud Investiga" of the Ministry of Health and Social Action of Argentina


Awarded by German Federal Ministry of Education and Research


Awarded by Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network


Awarded by Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology


Awarded by Irish Cancer Society


Awarded by European Commission DG Health and Consumer Protection


Awarded by Federation of German Pension Insurance Institutes


Awarded by Medical Faculty of the University of Heidelberg


Awarded by Korea Health 21 R&D, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Republic of Korea


Awarded by National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) - Ministry of Education, Science and Technology


Awarded by medical faculty of the University of Heidelberg, Germany


Awarded by Instituto de Salud Carlos III


Awarded by Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (CONICYT)


Awarded by Fondo Nacional de Desarrolo Cientifico y Tecnologico (FONDECYT)


Awarded by Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare through Research on Psychiatric and Neurological Disease and Mental Health


Awarded by German Cancer Aid within the psychosocial oncology funding priority program


Awarded by NHMRC Program


Awarded by Ministry of Health of Spain


Awarded by Catalonia Government, DURSI


Awarded by German Federal Ministry for Education and Research


Awarded by University of Leipzig


Awarded by FAPEMIG


Awarded by Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Minas Gerais (Fapemig)


Awarded by Hungarian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR, KRS-144045 & PCG 155468). Dr. Wu was supported by an Utting Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Ms. Levis was supported by a CIHR Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarship doctoral award. Ms. Rice was supported by a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship. Mr. Bhandari was supported by a studentship from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. Dr. Patten was supported by a Senior Health Scholar award from Alberta Innovates, Health Solutions. The primary study by Scott et al. was supported by the Cumming School of Medicine and Alberta Health Services through the Calgary Health Trust, and funding from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute. The primary study by Amoozegar et al. was supported by the Alberta Health Services, the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, and the Hotchkiss Brain Institute. The primary study by Butnoriene et al. was supported by a grant from the Research Concil of Lithuania (LIG-03/2011). Dr. Jurate Butnoriene, PhD, who did the data collection and analysis as part of her PhD thesis for the primary study by Butnoriene et al., passed away and was unable to participate in this project. Dr. Robertas Bunevicius, MD, PhD (1958-2016) was the Principal Investigator of the primary studies by Butnoriene et al. and Bunevicius et al., but passed away and was unable to participate in this project. The primary study by Chen et al. was supported by the National Science Council, Taiwan (NSC 96-2314-B182A-090-MY2). The primary study by Cheung et al. was supported by the Waikato Clinical School, University of Auckland, the Waikato Medical Research Foundation and the Waikato Respiratory Research Fund. The primary study by Cukor et al. was supported in part by a Promoting Psychological Research and Training on Health-Disparities Issues at Ethnic Minority Serving Institutions Grants (ProDIGs) awarded to Dr. Cukor from the American Psychological Association. The primary study by De la Torre et al. was supported by a Research Grant "Ramon Carrillo-Arturo Ofiativa for Multicentric Studies" (2015) from the commission "Salud Investiga" of the Ministry of Health and Social Action of Argentina (Grant n 1853). The primary study by Douven was supported by Maastricht University, Health Foundation Limburg, and the Adriana van Rinsum-Ponsen Stichting. The primary study by Honarmand et al. was supported by a grant from the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada. The primary study by Fischer et al. was supported as part of the RECODEHF study by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (01GY1150). The primary study by Gagnon et al. was supported by the Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network. The primary study by Akechi et al. was supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Cancer Research (11-2) from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare and a Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The primary study by Kugaya et al. was supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Cancer Research (9-31) and the Second-Term Comprehensive 10-year Strategy for Cancer Control from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The primary study Ryan et al. was supported by the Irish Cancer Society (Grant CRPO8GAL). The primary study by Grassi et al. was supported by the European Commission DG Health and Consumer Protection (Agreement with the University of Ferrara -SI2.307317 2000CVGG2-026), the University of Ferrara, and the Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Ferrara. The primary study by Harter et al. was supported by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the Federation of German Pension Insurance Institutes, and the Freiburg/Bad Saeckingen Rehabilitation Research Network (Grant 01 GD 9802/4). The primary study by Keller et al. was supported by the Medical Faculty of the University of Heidelberg (grant no. 175/2000). The primary study by Jang et al. was supported by a grant from the Korea Health 21 R&D, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Republic of Korea. The primary study by Kang et al. was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2009-0087344), and was supported by a Grant of the Korea Health 21 R&D, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Republic of Korea (A102065). The primary study by Lowe et al. was supported by the medical faculty of the University of Heidelberg, Germany (Project 121/2000). The primary study by Navines et al. was supported in part by grants from the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (EO PI08/90869) and (PSIGEN-VHC Study: FIS-E08/00268). The primary study by Massardo et al. was supported by Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (CONICYT) grant #PFB12/2007 and Fondo Nacional de Desarrolo Cientifico y Tecnologico (FONDECYT; grant #1110849). The primary study by Matsuoka et al. was supported by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare through Research on Psychiatric and Neurological Disease and Mental Health (16190501, 19230701 and 20300701). The primary study by Hartung et al. was supported by the German Cancer Aid within the psychosocial oncology funding priority program (grant number 107465). The primary study by Consoli et al. was supported by grants from the French Society of Dermatology and the University Hospital of Saint Etienne. Dr. O'Donnell was supported by grants from NHMRC Program (1073041). The primary study by McFarlane et al. was supported by an Australian Government National Health and Medical Research Council program grant. The primary study by Sanchez-Gistau et al. was supported by a grant from the Ministry of Health of Spain (PI040418) and in part by Catalonia Government, DURSI 2009SGR1119. The primary study by Gould et al. was supported by the Transport Accident Commission Grant. The primary study by Lees et al. was supported by a `start-up' research grant from the British Geriatric Society, Scotland. The primary study by Reme et al. was supported by the Research Council of Norway. The primary study by Rooney et al. was supported by the NHS Lothian Neuro-Oncology Endowment Fund. The primary study by Schwarzbold et al. was supported by PRONEX Program (NENASC Project) and PPSUS Program of Fundacao de Amparo a esquisa e Inovacao do Estado de Santa Catarina (FAPESC) and the National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM). The primary study by Azah et al. was supported by Universiti Sains Malaysia. The primary study by Patel et al. was supported by the University of Sydney Cancer Research Fund. The primary study by Simard et al. was supported by IDEA grants from the Canadian Prostate Cancer Research Initiative and the Canadian Breast Cancer Research Alliance, as well as a studentship from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The primary study by Singer et al. was supported by a grant from the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research (no. 01ZZ0106).The primary study by Singer et al. was supported by grants from the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research (#7DZAIQTX) and of the University of Leipzig (#formel. 1-57). The primary study by Meyer et at was supported by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). The primary study by Stafford et al. was supported in part by seed funding from the Western and Central Melbourne Integrated Cancer Service. The primary study by Stafford et al. was supported by the University of Melbourne. The primary study by Stone et al. was supported by the Medical Research Council, UK and Chest Heart and Stroke, Scotland. The primary study by de Oliveira et at was supported by CNPq and Fapemig, Brazil. The primary study by Pedroso et al. was supported by FAPEMIG (APq-03539-13). The primary study by Pedroso et al. was supported by Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Minas Gerais (Fapemig) (APq-03539-13). The primary study by Tiringer et al. was supported by the Hungarian Research Council (ETT 395). The primary study by Turner et al. was supported by a bequest from Jennie Thomas through Hunter Medical Research Institute. The primary study by Walterfang et al. was supported by Melbourne Health. Drs. Benedetti and Thombs were supported by FRQS researcher salary awards.