Journal article

Pregnancy-specific malarial immunity and risk of malaria in pregnancy and adverse birth outcomes: a systematic review

Julia C Cutts, Paul A Agius, Lin Zaw, Rosanna Powell, Kerryn Moore, Bridget Draper, Julie A Simpson, Freya JI Fowkes

BMC Medicine | BMC | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In endemic areas, pregnant women are highly susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria characterized by the accumulation of parasitized red blood cells (pRBC) in the placenta. In subsequent pregnancies, women develop protective immunity to pregnancy-associated malaria and this has been hypothesized to be due to the acquisition of antibodies to the parasite variant surface antigen VAR2CSA. In this systematic review we provide the first synthesis of the association between antibodies to pregnancy-specific P. falciparum antigens and pregnancy and birth outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based studies (published up to 07 June 2019) o..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Australian Centre of Research Excellence in Malaria Elimination (ACREME)


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia [Career Development fellowship 1166753 (to F.J.I.F.), senior research fellowships 1104975 (to J.A.S.) and the Australian Centre of Research Excellence in Malaria Elimination (ACREME) 1134989], the Australian Research Council [Future Fellowships FT130101122 (to F.J.I.F.), and a Victorian State Government Operational Infrastructure Support grant. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.