Journal article

A Systematic Review of Behavioral Interventions to Decrease Opioid Prescribing After Surgery

David DQ Zhang, Jess Sussman, Fahima Dossa, Naheed Jivraj, Karim Ladha, Sav Brar, David Urbach, Andrea C Tricco, Duminda N Wijeysundera, Hance A Clarke, Nancy N Baxter

Annals of Surgery | LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS | Published : 2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to summarize strategies to reduce postsurgical opioid prescribing at discharge. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Current practices for the prescription of opioids at discharge after surgery are highly variable and often excessive. We conducted a systematic review to identify behavioral interventions designed to improve these practices. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO until December 14, 2018 to identify studies of behavioral interventions designed to decrease opioid prescribing at discharge among adults undergoing surgery. Behavioral interventions were defined according to the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) t..

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Grants

Awarded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research Operating Grant: Opioid Crisis Knowledge Synthesis


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors thank Teruko Kishibe, information specialist at the Scotiabank Health Sciences Library, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital for designing the literature search strategy and conducting the search, and also thank Arlinda Ruco, graduate student, and Brittany Speller, research assistant, from their help with citation screening. Dr. Tricco is supported by a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Knowledge Synthesis. Dr. Ladha and Dr. Clarke are supported, in part, by Merit Awards from the Department of Anesthesia at the University of Toronto. Dr. Wijeysundera is supported, in part, by a New Investigator Award from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, an Excellence in Research Award from the Department of Anesthesia at the University of Toronto, and the Endowed Chair in Translational Anesthesiology Research at St. Michael's Hospital and University of Toronto. This study was funded by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Operating Grant: Opioid Crisis Knowledge Synthesis (Funding Reference Number OCK 156784). The funding sources had no role in the design or conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, or interpretation of the data; or preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript.