Journal article

Methods to Visualize Elements in Plants(1)([OPEN])

Peter M Kopittke, Enzo Lombi, Antony van der Ent, Peng Wang, Jamie S Laird, Katie L Moore, Daniel P Persson, Soren Husted

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY | OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC | Published : 2020

Abstract

Understanding the distribution of elements in plants is important for researchers across a broad range of fields, including plant molecular biology, agronomy, plant physiology, plant nutrition, and ionomics. However, it is often challenging to evaluate the applicability of the wide range of techniques available, with each having its own strengths and limitations. Here, we compare scanning/transmission electron microscopy-based energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence microscopy, particle-induced x-ray emission, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, nanoscale secondary ion mass spectroscopy, autoradiography, and confocal microscopy with fluorophores. For..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research, and Tertiary Education, Australian Government j Australian Research Council


Awarded by Sonic Essentials through the Linkage Projects funding scheme


Awarded by Research Training Program, the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province (Jiangsu Province Natural Science Fund)


Awarded by Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities


Awarded by University of Queensland Major Equipment and Infrastructure Advanced Micro-X-Ray Fluorescence Facility for Biological, Medical, Materials Science, and Geochemistry


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research, and Tertiary Education, Australian Government j Australian Research Council and Sonic Essentials through the Linkage Projects funding scheme (grant no. LP130100741) and the Research Training Program, the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province (Jiangsu Province Natural Science Fund) (grant no. BK20180025), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (grant no. KJJQ201902). The laboratory XFM instrument was funded through the University of Queensland Major Equipment and Infrastructure Advanced Micro-X-Ray Fluorescence Facility for Biological, Medical, Materials Science, and Geochemistry (grant no. UQMEI1835893). A Housing Grant (to P.M.K.) was provided by the National Bank (Denmark). Parts of this research were undertaken on the XFM beamline at the Australian Synchrotron, part of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation.