Journal article

Environmental mismatch: Do associations between the built environment and physical activity among youth depend on concordance with perceptions?

Venurs Loh, Jenny Veitch, Jo Salmon, Ester Cerin, Suzanne Mavoa, Karen Villanueva, Anna Timperio

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health | MDPI AG | Published : 2020

Abstract

Without accurate awareness of features within the built environment, the availability of a supportive built environment alone may not be sufficient to influence physical activity levels. We examined the moderating effects of concordance/discordance between selected objective and perceived built environment features in the relationship between objective built environment features and physical activity. Cross-sectional data from 465 youth aged 12–20 years from 18 schools in Melbourne, Australia were used. The relationship between trails and physical activity differed by concordance/discordance. There were positive relationships among those with concordant perceptions, but no significant differ..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health (NIH)


Awarded by Australian National Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Principal Research Fellowship


Awarded by Australian Research Council Future Fellowship


Awarded by Australian NHMRC Early Career Fellowship


Awarded by National Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

This study received funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 HL111378. JV is supported by an Australian National Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship (ID 101928). JS was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Principal Research Fellowship (APP1026216) during this study. EC is supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (FT14010085). SM is supported by an Australian NHMRC Early Career Fellowship (#1121035). AT was supported by a National Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship (Award 100046) during the study.