Journal article

Learning Morphologically Complex Spoken Words: Orthographic Expectations of Embedded Stems Are Formed Prior to Print Exposure

Elisabeth Beyersmann, Signy Wegener, Kate Nation, Ayako Prokupzcuk, Hua-Chen Wang, Anne Castles

JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION | AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC | Published : 2021

Abstract

It is well known that information from spoken language is integrated into reading processes, but the nature of these links and how they are acquired is less well understood. Recent evidence has suggested that predictions about the written form of newly learned spoken words are already generated prior to print exposure. We extend this work to morphologically complex words and ask whether the information that is available in spoken words goes beyond the mappings between phonology and orthography. Adults were taught the oral form of a set of novel morphologically complex words (e.g., "neshing", "neshed", "neshes"), with a 2nd set serving as untrained items. Following oral training, participants..

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Grants

Awarded by Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) by the Australian Research Council


Awarded by Economic and Social Research Council


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

Elisabeth Beyersmann was supported by a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) by the Australian Research Council (DE190100850). Signy Wegener was supported by an Australian Government Research Training Program scholarship. This project also benefited from an Economic and Social Research Council Grant (ES/M009998/1) and an Australian Research Council Grant (DP150100149) to Kate Nation and Anne Castles.