Journal article

Trained Immunity: Linking Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease across the Life-Course?

Siroon Bekkering, Christoph Saner, Niels P Riksen, Mihai G Netea, Matthew A Sabin, Richard Saffery, Rinke Stienstra, David P Burgner

Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism | ELSEVIER SCIENCE LONDON | Published : 2020

Abstract

Obesity, a chronic inflammatory disease, is the most prevalent modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms underlying inflammation in obesity are incompletely understood. Recent developments have challenged the dogma of immunological memory occurring exclusively in the adaptive immune system and show that the innate immune system has potential to be reprogrammed. This innate immune memory (trained immunity) is characterized by epigenetic and metabolic reprogramming of myeloid cells following endogenous or exogenous stimulation, resulting in enhanced inflammation to subsequent stimuli. Trained immunity phenotypes have now been reported for other immune and non-immune cel..

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Grants

Awarded by Rubicon grant from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO)


Awarded by European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation program REPROGRAM


Awarded by IN-CONTROL CVON grant fromthe Dutch Heart Foundation


Awarded by ERC Advanced Grant


Awarded by Spinoza grant of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research


Awarded by ERA-CVD Joint Transnational Call 2018 - Dutch Heart Foundation (JTC2018, project MEMORY)


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia)


Funding Acknowledgements

S.B. is supported by a Rubicon grant from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO, No. 452173113). N.P.R. and M.G.N. received funding from the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation program REPROGRAMunder grant agreement No. 667837 and received an IN-CONTROL CVON grant fromthe Dutch Heart Foundation (CVON2012-03 and CVON2018-27). M.G.N is further supported by an ERC Advanced Grant (#833247) and a Spinoza grant of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO SPI 94-212). N.P.R. is recipient of a grant of the ERA-CVD Joint Transnational Call 2018, which is supported by the Dutch Heart Foundation (JTC2018, project MEMORY; 2018T093). R.St. is supported by a senior fellowship of the Dutch Diabetes Foundation. D.P.B. is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) Senior Research Fellowship (GTN 1064629) and Investigator Grant (GTN 1175744). Research at Murdoch Children's Research Institute is supported by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program (Melbourne, Australia).