Journal article

IGEMS: The Consortium on Interplay of Genes and Environment Across Multiple Studies - An Update

Nancy L Pedersen, Margaret Gatz, Brian K Finch, Deborah Finkel, David A Butler, Anna Dahl Aslan, Carol E Franz, Jaakko Kaprio, Susan Lapham, Matt McGue, Miriam A Mosing, Jenae Neiderhiser, Marianne Nygaard, Matthew Panizzon, Carol A Prescott, Chandra A Reynolds, Perminder Sachdev, Keith E Whitfield

TWIN RESEARCH AND HUMAN GENETICS | CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS | Published : 2019

Abstract

The Interplay of Genes and Environment across Multiple Studies (IGEMS) is a consortium of 18 twin studies from 5 different countries (Sweden, Denmark, Finland, United States, and Australia) established to explore the nature of gene-environment (GE) interplay in functioning across the adult lifespan. Fifteen of the studies are longitudinal, with follow-up as long as 59 years after baseline. The combined data from over 76,000 participants aged 14-103 at intake (including over 10,000 monozygotic and over 17,000 dizygotic twin pairs) support two primary research emphases: (1) investigation of models of GE interplay of early life adversity, and social factors at micro and macro environmental leve..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by Swedish Council For Working Life and Social Research (FAS)


Awarded by Swedish Research Council


Awarded by US National Institute of Health


Awarded by NIA


Awarded by National Institute of Health


Awarded by ENGAGE -European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology, FP7-HEALTH-F4-2007


Awarded by National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism


Awarded by Academy of Finland Center of Excellence in Complex Disease Genetics


Awarded by Academy of Finland


Awarded by National Institute on Aging


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC)


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Centre for Research Excellence Grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by NIH



Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON ALCOHOL ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM


Funding Acknowledgements

IGEMS is supported by the National Institutes of Health Grants No. R01 AG037985, R56 AG037985, R01 AG059329, R01 AG060470, RF1 AG058068. SATSA was supported by grants R01 AG04563, R01 AG10175, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Successful Aging, the Swedish Council For Working Life and Social Research (FAS) (97:0147: 1B, 2009-0795) and Swedish Research Council (825-2007-7460, 825-2009-6141). OCTO-Twin was supported by grant R01 AG08861. Gender was supported by the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Successful Aging, The Axel and Margaret Ax:son Johnson's Foundation, The Swedish Council for Social Research and the Swedish Foundation for Health Care Sciences and Allergy Research. TOSS was supported by grant R01 MH54610 from the National Institutes of Health. The Danish Twin Registry is supported by grants from The National Program for Research Infrastructure 2007 from the Danish Agency for Science and Innovation, the Velux Foundation and the US National Institute of Health (P01 AG08761). The Minnesota Twin Study of Adult Development and Aging was supported by NIA grant R01 AG06886. VETSA was supported by National Institute of Health grants NIA R01 AG018384, R01 AG018386, R01 AG022381 and R01 AG022982, and, in part, with resources of the VA San Diego Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health. The Cooperative Studies Program of the Office of Research & Development of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs has provided financial support for the development and maintenance of the Vietnam Era Twin (VET) Registry. Data collection and analyses in the Finnish Twin Cohort and Finntwin16 have been supported by ENGAGE -European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology, FP7-HEALTH-F4-2007, grant agreement number 201413, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (grants AA-12502, AA-00145 and AA-09203), the Academy of Finland Center of Excellence in Complex Disease Genetics (grant numbers: 213506, 129680) and the Academy of Finland (grants 100499, 205585, 118555, 141054, 265240, 263278, 264146, 308248 and 312073). This MIDUS study was supported by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Successful Midlife Development and by National Institute on Aging Grant AG20166. Funding for the Australian Over-50's twin study was supported by Mr. George Landers of Chania, Crete. We acknowledge the contribution of the OATS research team (https://cheba.unsw.edu.au/project/older-australiantwins-study) to this study. The OATS study has been funded by a National Health & Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and Australian Research Council (ARC) Strategic Award Grant of the Ageing Well, Ageing Productively Program (ID No. 401162) and NHMRC Project Grants (ID 1045325 and 1085606). OATS participant recruitment was facilitated through Twins Research Australia, a national resource in part supported by a Centre for Research Excellence Grant (ID: 1079102), from the National Health and Medical Research Council. We thank the participants for their time and generosity in contributing to this research. The Carolina African American Twin Study of Aging (CAATSA) was funded by NIA grant R01 AG13662. The Project Talent Twin Study has been supported by National Institute of Health grants R01 AG043656 and R01 AG056163, and development funds from American Institutes of Research. Funding for archiving the NAS-NRC Twin Registry data was provided by NIH Grant No. R21 AG039572.The content of this manuscript is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIA/NIH, or the VA.