Journal article

Association of clinically important traumatic brain injury and Glasgow Coma Scale scores in children with head injury

Amit Kochar, Meredith L Borland, Natalie Phillips, Sarah Dalton, John Alexander Cheek, Jeremy Furyk, Jocelyn Neutze, Mark D Lyttle, Stephen Hearps, Stuart Dalziel, Silvia Bressan, Ed Oakley, Franz E Babl

Emergency Medicine Journal | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Head injury (HI) is a common presentation to emergency departments (EDs). The risk of clinically important traumatic brain injury (ciTBI) is low. We describe the relationship between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores at presentation and risk of ciTBI. METHODS: Planned secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of children<18 years who presented with HIs of any severity at 10 Australian/New Zealand centres. We reviewed all cases of ciTBI, with ORs (Odds Ratio) and their 95% CIs (Confidence Interval) calculated for risk of ciTBI based on GCS score. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the ability of total GCS score to discriminate ciTBI, mor..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council, Canberra, Australia


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (Centre of Research Excellence for Paediatric Emergency Medicine) Canberra, Australia


Awarded by Emergency Medicine Foundation, Brisbane, Australia


Awarded by Perpetual Philanthropic Services, Australia


Awarded by Auckland Medical Research Foundation, Auckland, New Zealand


Awarded by Health Research Council of New Zealand


Funding Acknowledgements

The study was funded by grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council (project grant GNT1046727, Centre of Research Excellence for Paediatric Emergency Medicine GNT1058560), Canberra, Australia; the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia; the Emergency Medicine Foundation (EMPJ-11162), Brisbane, Australia; Perpetual Philanthropic Services (2012/1140),Australia; Auckland Medical Research Foundation (No. 3112011) and the A + Trust (Auckland District Health Board), Auckland, New Zealand; WA Health Targeted Research Funds 2013, Perth, Australia; the Townsville Hospital and Health Service Private Practice Research and Education Trust Fund, Townsville, Australia; and supported by the Victorian Government's Infrastructure Support Program, Melbourne, Australia. FEB's time was part funded by a grant from the Royal Children's Hospital Foundation, Melbourne, Australia, a Melbourne Children's Clinician Scientist Fellowship, Melbourne, Australia; and an NHMRC Practitioner Fellowship, Canberra, Australia. SRD's time was part funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand (HRC13/556).