Journal article

Which microbial factors really are important in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections?

Audrey Crousilles, Eve Maunders, Sean Bartlett, Catherine Fan, Emem-Fong Ukor, Yassmin Abdelhamid, Ysobel Baker, Andres Floto, David R Spring, Martin Welch

Future Microbiology | FUTURE MEDICINE LTD | Published : 2015

Abstract

Over the last two decades, tens of millions of dollars have been invested in understanding virulence in the human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the top 'hits' obtained in a recent TnSeq analysis aimed at identifying those genes that are conditionally essential for infection did not include most of the known virulence factors identified in these earlier studies. Instead, it seems that P. aeruginosa faces metabolic challenges in vivo, and unless it can overcome these, it fails to thrive and is cleared from the host. In this review, we look at the kinds of metabolic pathways that the pathogen seems to find essential, and comment on how this knowledge might be therapeutically exploi..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by BBSRC


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

Work in the M Welch laboratory is funded by the BBSRC (grant BB/M019411/1) and the EU (Marie Curie Educational Training Network 'INTEGRATE'). A Crousilles is supported by the Cambridge Trusts. E Maunders is funded by a studentship from the MRC. S Bartlett is supported by a Hershel Smith studentship. E-F Ukor is a clinical research fellow funded by the CF Trust (UK), Papworth Hospital NHS Trust and the Wellcome Trust. Y Abdelhamid is supported by a scholarship from the Yosef Jameel Foundation. Y Baker is an EPSRC-funded PhD student. A Crousilles is supported by the Cambridge Commonwealth, European and International Trust. Work in the laboratory of A Floto is supported by the Wellcome Trust. Work in the DR Spring laboratory is supported by the EPSRC. The authors have no other relevant affiliations or financial involvement with any organization or entity with a financial interest in or financial conflict with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript apart from those disclosed.