Journal article

Tolerability of Antiseizure Medications in Individuals With Newly Diagnosed Epilepsy

Bshra Ali A Alsfouk, Martin J Brodie, Matthew Walters, Patrick Kwan, Zhibin Chen

JAMA Neurology | AMER MEDICAL ASSOC | Published : 2020

Abstract

Importance: Tolerability is a key determinant of the effectiveness of epilepsy treatment. It is important to evaluate whether the overall tolerability has improved. Objective: To identify factors associated with poor tolerability of antiseizure medications (ASMs) and examine temporal changes in tolerability. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a longitudinal cohort study at a specialist clinic in Glasgow, Scotland. Patients with newly diagnosed and treated epilepsy between July 1982 and October 2012 were included from 2282 eligible individuals. They were followed up until April 2016 or death. Data analysis was completed in August 2019. Exposures: Antiseizure medications. Main Outcome..

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Grants

Awarded by Medical Research Future Fund Practitioner Fellowship


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Early Career Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

Dr Brodie serves on the scientific advisory boards of Eisai, UCB Pharma, GlaxoSmithKline, Lundbeck, Bial, GW Pharmaceuticals, and Takeda; is on the speakers' bureau for Eisai, UCB Pharma, GlaxoSmithKline, Lundbeck, Sanofi Aventis, and Abbott Laboratories; and has accepted travel grants for scientific meetings from Eisai, UCB Pharma, and Lundbeck. Dr Kwan reports grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the Australian Research Council, the US National Institutes of Health, Hong Kong Research Grants Council, Innovation and Technology Fund, Health and Medical Research Fund, Biscayne Pharmaceuticals, Eisai, GWPharmaceuticals, LivaNova, Novartis, UCB Pharma, and Zynerba outside the submitted work; speaker fees from Eisai, LivaNova, and UCB Pharma outside the submitted work; and is supported by the Medical Research Future Fund Practitioner Fellowship (MRF1136427). Dr Chen reports grants from UCB Pharma outside the submitted work; is supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Early Career Fellowship (GNT1156444); and has received research grants from University of Melbourne Early Career Researcher Grant Scheme. No other disclosures were reported.