Journal article

Comparison of amyloid PET measured in Centiloid units with neuropathological findings in Alzheimer's disease

Sanka Amadoru, Vincent Dore, Catriona A McLean, Fairlie Hinton, Claire E Shepherd, Glenda M Halliday, Cristian E Leyton, Paul A Yates, John R Hodges, Colin L Masters, Victor L Villemagne, Christopher C Rowe

Alzheimer's Research and Therapy | BMC | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Centiloid scale was developed to standardise the results of beta-amyloid (Aβ) PET. We aimed to determine the Centiloid unit (CL) thresholds for CERAD sparse and moderate-density neuritic plaques, Alzheimer's disease neuropathologic change (ADNC) score of intermediate or high probability of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), final clinicopathological diagnosis of AD, and expert visual read of a positive Aβ PET scan. METHODS: Aβ PET results in CL for 49 subjects were compared with post-mortem findings, visual read, and final clinicopathological diagnosis. The Youden Index was used to determine the optimal CL thresholds from receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. RESULTS: A thres..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders Memory Node


Funding Acknowledgements

Austin Health and Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health researchers are supported by governmental funding. The Sydney Brain Bank is supported by the University of New South Wales and Neuroscience Research Australia. The Victorian Brain Bank is supported by The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, The Alfred and the Victorian Forensic Institute of Medicine and funded in part by Parkinson's Victoria, MND Victoria, FightMND and Yulgilbar Foundation. This imaging and prospective tissue donation for research from the Sydney cohort was supported by funding to ForeFront, a collaborative research group dedicated to the study of frontotemporal dementia and motor neurodegenerative diseases, from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) program (#1037746) and project (#630489) grants and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders Memory Node (#CE110001021).