Journal article

Resilience Among Patients Across the Cancer Continuum: Diverse Perspectives

Yamile Molina, Jean C Yi, Javiera Martinez-Gutierrez, Kerryn W Reding, Joyce P Yi-Frazier, Abby R Rosenberg

CLINICAL JOURNAL OF ONCOLOGY NURSING | ONCOLOGY NURSING SOC | Published : 2014

Abstract

Each phase of the cancer experience profoundly affects patients' lives. Much of the literature has focused on negative consequences of cancer; however, the study of resilience may enable providers to promote more positive psychosocial outcomes before, during, and after the cancer experience. The current review describes the ways in which elements of resilience have been defined and studied at each phase of the cancer continuum. Extensive literature searches were conducted to find studies assessing resilience during one or more stages of the adult cancer continuum. For all phases of the cancer continuum, resilience descriptions included preexisting or baseline characteristics, such as demogra..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Cancer Institute


Awarded by National Canter Institute


Awarded by National Institute of Nursing Research grant


Awarded by Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award


Awarded by NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NURSING RESEARCH


Funding Acknowledgements

Yamile Molina, PhD, MS, is an affiliated researcher at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, WA, an MPH student in the Departments of Epidemiology and Piostatistics at the University of Illinois-Chicago, and a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Health Services in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington in Seattle; Jean C. Yi, PhD, is a staff scientist at the Fred Hutchinson Canter Research Center; Javiera Martinez-Gutierrez, MD, MPH, is an associate instructor at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile in Santiago and an affiliated researcher at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and in the Department of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington; Kerryn W. Reding; PhD, MPH, is an assistant professor at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and an affiliated researcher in the School of Nursing at the University of Washington; Joyce P. Yi-Frazier, PhD, is a research assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine at the University of Washington and at the Seattle Children's Hospital in Washington; and Abby R. Rosenberg, MD, MS, is an instructor in the Department of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine at the Seattle Children's Hospital, at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and at the University of Washington. The authors take full responsibility for the content of the article. Funding for this work was provided to Molina by two National Cancer Institute grants (Nos. P50CA148143 and R25 CA92408), to Martinez-Gutierrez by a National Canter Institute grant (No. R25 CA92408) issued to the Biobehavioral Cancer Prevention and Control Training,Prograin at the University of Washington, to Reding by a National Institute of Nursing Research grant (No. K99NR012232), and to Rosenberg by the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (No. T32CA009351). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Cancer Institute the National Institute of Nursing Research, or the National Institutes of Health. The content of this article has been reviewed by independent peer reviewers to ensure that it is balanced, objective, and free from commercial bias. No financial relationships relevant to the content of this article have been disclosed by the independent peer reviewers or editorial staff. Rosenberg can be reached at abby.rosenberg@seattlethildrens.org, with copy to editor at CJONEditor@ons.org. (Submitted November 2012. Revision submitted May 2013. Accepted for publication May 20; 2013.)