Journal article

Monitoring and Managing Cabin Crew Sleep and Fatigue During an Ultra-Long Range Trip

Margo J van den Berg, T Leigh Signal, Hannah M Mulrine, Alexander AT Smith, Philippa H Gander, Wynand Serfontein

AEROSPACE MEDICINE AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE | AEROSPACE MEDICAL ASSOC | Published : 2015

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aims of this study were to monitor cabin crew fatigue, sleep, and performance on an ultra-long range (ULR) trip and to evaluate the appropriateness of applying data collection methods developed for flight crew to cabin crew operations under a fatigue risk management system (FRMS). METHODS: Prior to, throughout, and following the ULR trip (outbound flight ULR; mean layover duration=52.6 h; inbound flight long range), 55 cabin crew (29 women; mean age 36.5 yr; 25 men; mean age 36.6 yr; one missing data) completed a sleep/duty diary and wore an actigraph. Across each flight, crewmembers rated their fatigue (Samn-Perelli Crew Status Check) and sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Sc..

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Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge the significant contribution of the participating cabin crewmembers and their diligence in completing the study requirements. We would also like to acknowledge the involvement of the research assistants at South African Airways, namely Barbie Moonsamy, Carol Myaluza, Ayanda Toti, Beverly Seabi, Heather Marule, Samantha Narisamulu, Carey Bouwer, and Masilo Matseke, and at the Sleep/Wake Research Centre, Rosie Gibson, Sophie McCashin, and Hannah Timms for their assistance with the data processing. This study was funded by South African Airways.