Journal article

Alterations in the methylome of the stromal tumour microenvironment signal the presence and severity of prostate cancer

Mitchell G Lawrence, Ruth Pidsley, Birunthi Niranjan, Melissa Papargiris, Brooke A Pereira, Michelle Richards, Linda Teng, Sam Norden, Andrew Ryan, Mark Frydenberg, Clare Stirzaker, Renea A Taylor, Gail P Risbridger, Susan J Clark

Clinical Epigenetics | BMC | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer changes the phenotype of cells within the stromal microenvironment, including fibroblasts, which in turn promote tumour progression. Functional changes in prostate cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) coincide with alterations in DNA methylation levels at loci-specific regulatory regions. Yet, it is not clear how these methylation changes compare across CAFs from different patients. Therefore, we examined the consistency and prognostic significance of genome-wide DNA methylation profiles between CAFs from patients with different grades of primary prostate cancer. RESULTS: We used Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChips to evaluate genome-wide DNA methylation profiles f..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by Cancer Australia


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Cancer Institute of New South Wales


Awarded by Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia (Movember Young Investigator Grant)


Awarded by Cancer Council New South Wales


Awarded by Victorian Government through the Victorian Cancer Agency


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was funded by Cancer Australia (1044458), the National Health and Medical Research Council (Project grant 1106870; Fellowships to SJC 1063559; GPR 1002648 & 1102752 and MGL 1035721), Cancer Institute of New South Wales (Fellowship to RP 14/ECF/1-23), Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia (Movember Young Investigator Grant to MGL YI0911), Cancer Council New South Wales (RG 18-09), the Victorian Government through the Victorian Cancer Agency (Fellowships RAT MCRF15023 and MGL MCRF18017), the Australian Government Research Training Program (RTP) (Scholarship to BAP), RT Hall Trust and TissuPath Pathology.