Journal article

Amyloid-beta burden predicts prospective decline in body mass index in clinically normal adults

Jennifer S Rabin, Zahra Shirzadi, Walter Swardfager, Bradley J MacIntosh, Aaron Schultz, Hyun-Sik Yang, Rachel F Buckley, Jennifer R Gatchel, Dylan Kirn, Jeremy J Pruzin, Trey Hedden, Nir Lipsman, Dorene M Rentz, Sandra E Black, Keith A Johnson, Reisa A Sperling, Jasmeer P Chhatwal

Neurobiology of Aging | ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC | Published : 2020

Abstract

In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that higher amyloid-beta (Aβ) burden at baseline is associated with greater longitudinal decline in body mass index (BMI) in clinically normal adults. Participants from the Harvard Aging Brain Study (n = 312) and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 336) underwent Aβ positron emission tomography at baseline. BMI was assessed longitudinally over a median of >4 years. Linear mixed models showed that higher baseline Aβ burden was significantly associated with greater decline in BMI in both the Harvard Aging Brain Study (t = -1.93; p = 0.05) and Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative cohorts (t = -2.54; p = 0.01), after adjustin..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH)


Awarded by NIA/NIH


Awarded by NHMRC Dementia Research Fellowship


Awarded by BrightFocus Foundation ADRF


Awarded by Brain Canada


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (P01 AG036694 to R.A.S. and K.A.J., K24 AG035007 to R.A.S., K23 AG049087 to J.P.C., R01 AG053509 and R01 AG054110 to T.H, and P50 AG005134 to R.A.S., K.A.J., and T.H. J.S.R. was supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Postdoctoral Fellowship Award, H.-S.Y. is supported by NIA/NIH K23 AG062750; R.F.B. is supported by the NHMRC Dementia Research Fellowship (APP1105576). J.R.G. is supported by NIA/NIH K23 AG058805, AACF-16-440965 and BrightFocus Foundation ADRF A2016434 F. W.S. is supported by the Alzheimer's Association and Brain Canada (AARG501466).