Journal article

Peripheral Blood Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Tuberculosis Patients and Healthy Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Exposed Controls

Sara Suliman, Anele Gela, Simon C Mendelsohn, Sarah K Iwany, Kattya Lopez Tamara, Simbarashe Mabwe, Nicole Bilek, Fatoumatta Darboe, Michelle Fisher, Alexandra J Corbett, Lars Kjer-Nielsen, Sidonia BG Eckle, Chuan-Chin Huang, Zibiao Zhang, David M Lewinsohn, James McCluskey, Jamie Rossjohn, Mark Hatherill, Segundo R Leon, Roger Calderon Show all

Journal of Infectious Diseases | OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In human blood, mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant T cells that recognize antigens presented on non-polymorphic major histocompatibility complex-related 1 (MR1) molecules. The MAIT cells are activated by mycobacteria, and prior human studies indicate that blood frequencies of MAIT cells, defined by cell surface markers, decline during tuberculosis (TB) disease, consistent with redistribution to the lungs. METHODS: We tested whether frequencies of blood MAIT cells were altered in patients with TB disease relative to healthy Mycobacterium tuberculosis-exposed controls from Peru and South Africa. We quantified their frequencies using MR1 tetramers loaded with 5..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health (NIH) TB Research Unit Network


Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by DECRA Fellowship from the Australian Research Council


Awarded by Fogarty International Centre of the NIH


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) TB Research Unit Network (Grant U19 AI111224-01), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (R01 AI049313), the Strategic Health Innovation Partnerships Unit of the South African Medical Research Council with funds received from the South African Department of Science and Technology and a research grant from Aeras. A. J. C. is supported by a Future Fellowship (FT160100083) from the Australian Research Council. S. B. G. E. is supported by a DECRA Fellowship (DE170100407) from the Australian Research Council. S. C. M. received training in research that was supported by the Fogarty International Centre of the NIH under Award Number D43 TW010559.