Journal article

Study protocol for the 'HelpMeDoIt!' randomised controlled feasibility trial: an app, web and social support-based weight loss intervention for adults with obesity

Lynsay Matthews, Juliana Pugmire, Laurence Moore, Mark Kelson, Alex McConnachie, Emma McIntosh, Sarah Morgan-Trimmer, Simon Murphy, Kathryn Hughes, Elinor Coulman, Olga Utkina-Macaskill, Sharon Anne Simpson

BMJ Open | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2017

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: HelpMeDoIt! will test the feasibility of an innovative weight loss intervention using a smartphone app and website. Goal setting, self-monitoring and social support are three key facilitators of behaviour change. HelpMeDoIt! incorporates these features and encourages participants to invite 'helpers' from their social circle to help them achieve their goal(s). AIM: To test the feasibility of the intervention in supporting adults with obesity to achieve weight loss goals. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: 12-month feasibility randomised controlled trial and accompanying process evaluation. Participants (n=120) will be adults interested in losing weight, body mass index (BMI)> 30 kg/m2 and sm..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute of Health Research (Public Health Research Programme)


Awarded by Chief Scientist Office core funding as part of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit 'Social Relationships and Health Improvement' programme


Awarded by 'Complexity in Health Improvement' programme


Awarded by MRC


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Institute for Health Research


Awarded by Chief Scientist Office


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Institute of Health Research (Public Health Research Programme grant number 12/180/20). Additional time on the study was supported by UK Medical Research Council and Chief Scientist Office core funding as part of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit 'Social Relationships and Health Improvement' programme (MC_UU_12017/11 and SPHSU11) and 'Complexity in Health Improvement' programme (MC_UU_12017/14 and SPHSU14). SS was supported by MRC Strategic Award MC_PC_13027.