Journal article

CRISP3 expression drives prostate cancer invasion and progression

Marianna Volpert, Luc Furic, Jinghua Hu, Anne E O'Connor, Richard J Rebello, Shivakumar Keerthikumar, Jemma Evans, D Jo Merriner, John Pedersen, Gail P Risbridger, Peter McIntyre, Moira K O'Bryan

Endocrine-Related Cancer | BIOSCIENTIFICA LTD | Published : 2020

Abstract

Identifying the factors stimulating prostate cancer cells migration and invasion has the potential to bring new therapeutic targets to the clinic. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3) is one of the most highly upregulated proteins during the transition of a healthy human prostatic epithelium to prostate cancer. Here we show using a genetically engineered mouse model of prostate cancer that CRISP3 production greatly facilitates disease progression from carcinoma in situ to invasive prostate cancer in vivo. This interpretation was confirmed using both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines, which showed that exposure to CRISP3 enhanced cell motility and invasion. Further, using mass ..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by Australian Research Council fellowship


Awarded by Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia Young Investigator award


Awarded by Department of Health and Human Services acting through the Victorian Cancer Agency


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was funded in part by a research grant to M K O'B and P Mc I from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC, APP606562). L F was funded by an Australian Research Council fellowship (DE120100434) and a Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia Young Investigator award (YI-0310). L F was supported in part by the Department of Health and Human Services acting through the Victorian Cancer Agency (MCRF16007). G P R and M K O'B were funded by fellowships from the NHMRC (APP1002648, APP1058356). M V was funded by an APA scholarship from the Australian Government and the Sydney Parker Smith Postdoctoral Research Fellowship from the Cancer Council Victoria. J H was funded by a PhD scholarship from the Chinese Scholarship Council. R J R was funded by a MBio Discovery Scholarship from Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Monash University, Australia.