Journal article

Impaired olfactory ability associated with larger left hippocampus and rectus volumes at earliest stages of schizophrenia: A sign of neuroinflammation?

Yuri Masaoka, Dennis Velakoulis, Warrick J Brewer, Vanessa L Cropley, Cali F Bartholomeusz, Alison R Yung, Barnaby Nelson, Dominic Dwyer, Cassandra MJ Wannan, Masahiko Izumizaki, Patrick D McGorry, Stephen J Wood, Christos Pantelis

Psychiatry Research | ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD | Published : 2020

Abstract

Impaired olfactory identification has been reported as a first sign of schizophrenia during the earliest stages of illness, including before illness onset. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between volumes of these regions (amygdala, hippocampus, gyrus rectus and orbitofrontal cortex) and olfactory ability in three groups of participants: healthy control participants (Ctls), patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FE-Scz) and chronic schizophrenia patients (Scz). Exploratory analyses were performed in a sample of individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis in a co-submission paper (Masaoka et al., 2020). The relationship to brain structural measures was not appa..

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Grants

Awarded by KAKENHI


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Awarded by Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD) Distinguished Investigator Award (US)


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Investigator Grant


Awarded by Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD) Young Investigator Award


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

Y. Masaoka was supported by Grant-in-aids for Scientific Research (KAKENHI, Grant Number, 15K00210) and Scientific Research Fund of Showa University School of Medicine. Data for the study was supported by Project Grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC, IDs: 970598 and 981112), the Ian Potter Foundation, Melbourne; Woods Family Trust, Melbourne, and a Program Grant from the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, Melbourne.C. Pantelis was supported by a NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (628386 & 1105825), and a Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD) Distinguished Investigator Award (US; Grant ID: 18722). V. Cropley was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Investigator Grant (1177370) and a Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD) Young Investigator Award (21660).B. Nelson was supported by an NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship (ID: 1137687).