Journal article

Variation among 532 genomes unveils the origin and evolutionary history of a global insect herbivore

Minsheng You, Fushi Ke, Shijun You, Zhangyan Wu, Qingfeng Liu, Weiyi He, Simon W Baxter, Zhiguang Yuchi, Liette Vasseur, Geoff M Gurr, Christopher M Ward, Hugo Cerda, Guang Yang, Lu Peng, Yuanchun Jin, Miao Xie, Lijun Cai, Carl J Douglas, Murray B Isman, Mark S Goettel Show all

Nature Communications | Nature Research | Published : 2020

Abstract

The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella is a cosmopolitan pest that has evolved resistance to all classes of insecticide, and costs the world economy an estimated US $4-5 billion annually. We analyse patterns of variation among 532 P. xylostella genomes, representing a worldwide sample of 114 populations. We find evidence that suggests South America is the geographical area of origin of this species, challenging earlier hypotheses of an Old-World origin. Our analysis indicates that Plutella xylostella has experienced three major expansions across the world, mainly facilitated by European colonization and global trade. We identify genomic signatures of selection in genes related to meta..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of China


Awarded by International science and technology cooperation and exchange program of FAFU


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by National Key Research and Development Program of China


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors are very grateful to many researchers and volunteers for their kind help with collection of the P. xylostella specimens worldwide. Our special thanks go to Sean Graham of the University of British Columbia (UBC) for his kind help with the use of a computer server in Canada, to Yuelin Zhang for his kind supervision of Shijun You's PhD thesis that is related to this work, to Angel L. Viloria for his comments on the potential origin of P. xylostella and the information about early exportation of agricultural products in Americas, to Ihsan Al-Shehbaz for his information about South America Brassicaceae diversity. This work was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 31320103922 and No. 31230061), FujianTaiwan Joint Innovation Centre for Ecological Control of Crop Pests, International science and technology cooperation and exchange program of FAFU (KXb16014A), the Thousand Talents Program and the "111" Program in China, Australian Research Council grant FT140101303, and the National Key Research and Development Program of China (No. 2017YFD0201403).