Journal article

Do body mass index and waist-to-height ratio over the preceding decade predict retinal microvasculature in 11-12 year olds and midlife adults?

Mengjiao Liu, Kate Lycett, Tien Yin Wong, Jessica A Kerr, Mingguang He, Markus Juonala, Tim Olds, Terry Dwyer, David Burgner, Melissa Wake

International Journal of Obesity | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Microvascular changes may contribute to obesity-associated cardiovascular disease. We examined whether body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) (1) at multiple earlier time points and (2) decade-long trajectories predicted retinal microvascular parameters in mid-childhood/adulthood. METHODS: Participants/design: 1288 11-12 year olds (51% girls) and 1264 parents (87% mothers) in the population-based Child Health CheckPoint (CheckPoint) module within the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). LSAC exposure measures: biennial BMI z-score and WHtR for children at five time points from age 2-3 to 10-11 years and self-reported parent BMI at six time ..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by Royal Children's Hospital Foundation


Awarded by Murdoch Children's Research Institute, The University of Melbourne, National Heart Foundation of Australia


Awarded by Financial Markets Foundation for Children


Awarded by Australian National Health & Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Early Career Fellowship


Awarded by National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by National Heart Foundation of Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

This study uses data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) and Child Health CheckPoint. We thank the LSAC and CheckPoint study participants and families. We also thank the CheckPoint team and the Murdoch Children's Research Institute. LSAC is conducted in partnership between the Department of Social Services (DSS), the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS), and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The findings and views reported in this paper are those of the authors and should not be attributed to DSS, AIFS, or the ABS. MW and ML had full access to all the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. This work has been supported to date by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC; 1041352, 1109355), The Royal Children's Hospital Foundation (2014-241), Murdoch Children's Research Institute, The University of Melbourne, National Heart Foundation of Australia (100660), and Financial Markets Foundation for Children (2014-055; 2016-310). ML is supported by a Melbourne Research Scholarship. KL is supported by the Australian National Health & Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Early Career Fellowship 1091124 and National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship 101239. MJ is supported by Juho Vainio Foundation and federal research grants to Turku University Hospital. DB is supported by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship 1064629 and is an Honorary Future Leader Fellowship of the National Heart Foundation of Australia (100369). MW is supported by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship 1046518, Principal Research Fellowship 1160906, and Cure Kids New Zealand. Research at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute is supported by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Program. The funding bodies did not play any role in the study other than the generous provision of funds.