Journal article

Lower grip strength in youth with obesity identifies those with increased cardiometabolic risk

Tomi T Laitinen, Christoph Saner, Joel Nuotio, Matthew A Sabin, Brooklyn J Fraser, Brooke Harcourt, Markus Juonala, David P Burgner, Costan G Magnussen

OBESITY RESEARCH & CLINICAL PRACTICE | ELSEVIER SCI LTD | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: We examined whether grip strength differentiates youth with obesity with increased cardiometabolic risk. METHODS: The sample comprised 43 youth with severe obesity (mean age 14.8, standard deviation 3.0 years) enrolled in the Childhood Overweight BioRepository of Australia. Grip strength was normalized to body mass and categorized as low and moderate/high. RESULTS: Youth with low grip strength had higher systolic blood pressure (mean difference 13mmHg), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (0.26mmol/l), continuous metabolic syndrome score (0.36), and carotid intima-media thickness (0.05mm) compared with those with moderate/high grip strength. CONCLUSIONS: Low grip strength may dif..

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Grants

Awarded by National Heart Foundation of Australia Future Leader Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

TTL was supported by Maud Kuistila Foundation, Finnish Foundation for Cardiovascular Research, Finnish Medical Foundation, and Turku University Foundation. CS was supported for a oneyear clinical research fellowship position at the Endocrinology Department at the Royal Children's Hospital by "Batzebaer Foundation", Inselspital Bern; "Fondazione Ettore e Valeria Rossi"; "Freie akademische Gesellschaft Basel" and "NovoNordisk", all Switzerland. JN was supported by Juho Vainio Foundation, Finnish Foundation for Cardiovascular Research, and Turku University Foundation. BJF is supported by the Patricia F Gordon Scholarship in Medical Research. DPB is supported by a Principal Research Fellowship form the National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia). CGM is supported by National Heart Foundation of Australia Future Leader Fellowship (100849). Funding bodies and sponsors did not play a role in the study design, collection, analysis, and interpretation of data, in the writing of the manuscript, or the decision to submit the manuscript for publication.