Journal article

Sulfoxide-Containing Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles Demonstrate Minimal Protein Fouling and Improved Blood Circulation

Ruirui Qiao, Changkui Fu, Yuhuan Li, Xiaole Qi, Dalong Ni, Aparna Nandakumar, Ghizal Siddiqui, Haiyan Wang, Zheng Zhang, Tingting Wu, Jian Zhong, Shi-Yang Tang, Shuaijun Pan, Cheng Zhang, Michael R Whittaker, Jonathan W Engle, Darren J Creek, Frank Caruso, Pu Chun Ke, Weibo Cai Show all

Advanced Science | Wiley Open Access | Published : 2020

Abstract

Minimizing the interaction of nanomedicines with the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) is a critical challenge for their clinical translation. Conjugating polyethylene glycol (PEG) to nanomedicines is regarded as an effective approach to reducing the sequestration of nanomedicines by the MPS. However, recent concerns about the immunogenicity of PEG highlight the demand of alternative low‐fouling polymers as innovative coating materials for nanoparticles. Herein, a highly hydrophilic sulfoxide‐containing polymer—poly(2‐(methylsulfinyl)ethyl acrylate) (PMSEA)—is used for the surface coating of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). It is found that the PMSEA polymer coated IONPs have a more hydro..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of China


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by University of Queensland


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Funding Acknowledgements

R.Q., C.F., and Y.L. contributed equally to this work. This work was supported by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology (project number CE140100036). R.Q. acknowledges the financial support from National Health and Medical Research Council (APP1158755) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (81571746). A.W. acknowledges the financial support from Australian Research Council (CE140100036, DP0987407, DP110104299, DP180101221, LE0775684, LE0668517, and LE0882357) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (APP1021759). C.F. acknowledges the University of Queensland for a UQ Development Fellowship (UQFEL1831361). C.Z. acknowledges the National Health and Medical Research Council for his Early Career Fellowship (APP1157440). W.C. acknowledges the financial support from the National Institutes of Health (P30CA014520). The Australian National Fabrication Facility, Queensland Node, is also acknowledged for access to some items of equipment. The authors acknowledge the Monash Biomedical Proteomics and Metabolomics Facility, Monash University, for the provision of instrumentation, training, and technical support.