Journal article

Relationships Between Plasma Lipids Species, Gender, Risk Factors, and Alzheimer's Disease

Wei Ling Florence Lim, Kevin Huynh, Pratishtha Chatterjee, Ian Martins, Kaushala S Jayawardana, Corey Giles, Natalie A Mellett, Simon M Laws, Ashley I Bush, Christopher C Rowe, Victor L Villemagne, David Ames, Brian G Drew, Colin L Masters, Peter J Meikle, Ralph N Martins

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease | IOS PRESS | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lipid metabolism is altered in Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the relationship between AD risk factors (age, APOEɛ4, and gender) and lipid metabolism is not well defined. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether altered lipid metabolism associated with increased age, gender, and APOE status may contribute to the development of AD by examining these risk factors in healthy controls and also clinically diagnosed AD individuals. METHODS: We performed plasma lipidomic profiling (582 lipid species) of the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle flagship study of aging cohort (AIBL) using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Linear regression and interaction analysis were used t..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) for Mental Health - funded through the CRC Program


Funding Acknowledgements

Funding for the AIBL study was provided in part by the study partners [Commonwealth Scientific Industrial and research Organization (CSIRO), Edith Cowan University (ECU), Mental Health Research institute (MHRI), National Ageing Research Institute (NARI), Austin Health, CogState Ltd.]. The AIBL study has also received support from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and the Dementia Collaborative Research Centres program (DCRC2), as well as funding from the Science and Industry Endowment Fund (SIEF) and the Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) for Mental Health - funded through the CRC Program (Grant ID:20100104), an Australian Government Initiative. K.Hwas supported by a Dementia Australia Research Foundation Scholarship. PJM is supported by a Senior Research Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. This work was also supported in part by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program.