Journal article

Effect of Aspirin vs Placebo on the Prevention of Depression in Older People A Randomized Clinical Trial

Michael Berk, Robyn L Woods, Mark R Nelson, Raj C Shah, Christopher M Reid, Elsdon Storey, Sharyn Fitzgerald, Jessica E Lockery, Rory Wolfe, Mohammadreza Mohebbi, Seetal Dodd, Anne M Murray, Nigel Stocks, Paul B Fitzgerald, Catherine Mazza, Bruno Agustini, John J McNeil

JAMA Psychiatry | AMER MEDICAL ASSOC | Published : 2020

Abstract

Importance: Depression is associated with increased inflammation, which may precede its onset, especially in older people. Some preclinical data suggest potential antidepressant effects of aspirin, supported by limited observational data suggesting lower rates of depression in individuals treated with aspirin. There currently appears to be no evidence-based pharmacotherapies for the primary prevention of depression. Objective: To determine whether low-dose aspirin (100 mg) reduces the risk of depression in healthy older adults. Design, Setting, and Participants: This double-blinded, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial was a substudy of the Aspirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by US National Institute on Aging


Awarded by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The ASPREE-D study is funded by a project grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council (1081901). The ASPREE parent study, which recruited participants and was responsible for all follow-up measurements including clinical end points and other data capture, was funded primarily by a grant from the US National Institute on Aging (1R01AG029824-01A2), with additional support from Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council (ID334047), the Victorian Cancer Agency, and Monash University. Bayer Pharma AG provided matching aspirin and placebo tablets. Additional funding was received via a National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Principal Research Fellowship (grants APP1059660 and APP1156072 [Dr Berk] and 1045862 [Dr Reid]) and program grant (1092642 [Dr Reid]), the National Institutes of Health (Dr Murray), and the Heart Foundation (Dr Reid).