Journal article

Is Well-Being Associated With the Quantity and Quality of Social Interactions?

Jessie Sun, Kelci Harris, Simine Vazire

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology | AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC | Published : 2020

Abstract

Social relationships are often touted as critical for well-being. However, the vast majority of studies on social relationships have relied on self-report measures of both social interactions and well-being, which makes it difficult to disentangle true associations from shared method variance. To address this gap, we assessed the quantity and quality of social interactions using both self-report and observer-based measures in everyday life. Participants (N = 256; 3,206 observations) wore the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR), an unobtrusive audio recorder, and completed experience sampling method self-reports of their momentary social interactions, happiness, and feelings of social con..

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Grants

Awarded by National Science Foundation


Funding Acknowledgements

Data collection for this article was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation to Simine Vazire (BCS-1125553). A por-tion of these findings were presented at the Association for Psychological Science Annual Convention in New York City, New York, May 21-May 24, 2015. We are grateful to Luke Smillie and Rich Lucas for comments on a draft of this article, and to the many research assistants who ran participants and coded the EAR recordings. The quantitative data, R scripts, and Mplus input and output files required to reproduce the analyses reported in this article are available at https://osf.io/23vpz.Codebooks for all measures in the larger study are available at https://osf.io/akbfj.