Journal article

An Erg-driven transcriptional program controls B cell lymphopoiesis.

Ashley P Ng, Hannah D Coughlan, Soroor Hediyeh-Zadeh, Kira Behrens, Timothy M Johanson, Michael Sze Yuan Low, Charles C Bell, Omer Gilan, Yih-Chih Chan, Andrew J Kueh, Thomas Boudier, Rebecca Feltham, Anna Gabrielyan, Ladina DiRago, Craig D Hyland, Helen Ierino, Sandra Mifsud, Elizabeth Viney, Tracy Willson, Mark A Dawson Show all

Nature Communications | Nature Research (part of Springer Nature) | Published : 2020

Abstract

B lymphoid development is initiated by the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into lineage committed progenitors, ultimately generating mature B cells. This highly regulated process generates clonal immunological diversity via recombination of immunoglobulin V, D and J gene segments. While several transcription factors that control B cell development and V(D)J recombination have been defined, how these processes are initiated and coordinated into a precise regulatory network remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the transcription factor ETS Related Gene (Erg) is essential for early B lymphoid differentiation. Erg initiates a transcriptional network involving the B cell linea..

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Grants

Awarded by Independent Research Institutes Infrastructure Support Scheme Grant from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of America (LLS)



Funding Acknowledgements

We thank Janelle Lochland, Jason Corbin, Jasmine McManus, Melanie Salzone, Carolina Alvarado, Keti Stoev, Nicole Lynch and Shauna Ross for skilled assistance. We thank Professor Robert Brink for the V<INF>H</INF>10tar knock-in mouse line. This work was supported by Program Grants (1113577, 1016647, 1054618, 1054925), Project Grant (A.P.N. 1060179, 1122783, M.J.H. 1186575, 1159658), Fellowship (D.M.T. 1060675, S.L.N. 1155342, WSA 1058344, T.M.J. 1124081, M.J.H. 1156095), C.R.B. Blackburn Scholarship (M.S.Y.L., Australian National Health and Medical Research Council jointly with Royal Australasian College of Physicians) and Independent Research Institutes Infrastructure Support Scheme Grant (361646) from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, the Australian Cancer Research Fund and Victorian State Government Operational Infrastructure Support. Y.C.C. was supported through Maddie Riewoldt's Vision. M.J.H. was supported through the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of America (LLS SCOR 7001-13). The MAGEC laboratory was supported by the Australian Phenomics Network and the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy Program.