Journal article

Altered Immune Reconstitution in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

Daniel D Murray, John Zaunders, Samuel T Milliken, C Mee Ling Munier, Carole Ford, C Orla Morrissey, Malini Visweswaran, Sharon Avery, Joseph Sasadeusz, John Kwan, Shrinivas Desai, Matthew Law, Kersten K Koelsch, Sharon R Lewin, John Moore, Anthony D Kelleher, Mark N Polizzotto

CLINICAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES | OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC | Published : 2021

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at elevated risk of developing the malignant diseases that require allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Recent data suggest that these individuals are also at an elevated risk of certain complications post-ASCT. This risk may result from preexisting HIV-related factors affecting dynamics of immune reconstitution post-ASCT. However, to date, there has been little work describing the dynamics of immune reconstitution post-ASCT in persons with HIV and none comparing these data to controls without HIV. METHODS: We assessed T-cell reconstitution in 6 ASCT with HIV recipients (HIV+ASCT) compared to a control population ..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by American Foundation for AIDS Research


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Danish National Research Fund


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) (program grant 1052979) to A. D. K., S. R. L.). J. M. is funded by the St Vincent's Clinical Foundation. S. R. L. is funded by the Delaney AIDS Research Enterprise (DARE), National Institutes of Health (U19 AI096109 and UM1AI126611) and a high impact research grant from the American Foundation for AIDS Research (109226-58-RGRL). S. R. L. and M. N. P. receive NHMRC Fellowships (1042654). M. N. P. is also supported by the Cancer Institute NSW Future Research Leader Fellowship. D. D. M. is supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from the Danish National Research Fund (DNRF126).