Journal article

The Role of the Gastrointestinal Mucus System in Intestinal Homeostasis: Implications for Neurological Disorders

Madushani Herath, Suzanne Hosie, Joel C Bornstein, Ashley E Franks, Elisa L Hill-Yardin

FRONTIERS IN CELLULAR AND INFECTION MICROBIOLOGY | FRONTIERS MEDIA SA | Published : 2020

Abstract

Mucus is integral to gut health and its properties may be affected in neurological disease. Mucus comprises a hydrated network of polymers including glycosylated mucin proteins. We propose that factors that influence the nervous system may also affect the volume, viscosity, porosity of mucus composition and subsequently, gastrointestinal (GI) microbial populations. The gut has its own intrinsic neuronal network, the enteric nervous system, which extends the length of the GI tract and innervates the mucosal epithelium. The ENS regulates gut function including mucus secretion and renewal. Both dysbiosis and gut dysfunction are commonly reported in several neurological disorders such as Parkins..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council Future Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

MH received a Melbourne University PhD Stipend. This work was supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (FT160100126) and an RMIT Vice Chancellor's Senior Research Fellowship to EH-Y, which supported SH. JB received an NHMRC project grant (APP1158952).