Journal article

Printed educational messages fail to increase use of thiazides as first-line medication for hypertension in primary care: a cluster randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN72772651]

Merrick Zwarenstein, Jeremy M Grimshaw, Justin Presseau, Jill J Francis, Gaston Godin, Marie Johnston, Martin P Eccles, Jacqueline Tetroe, Susan K Shiller, Ruth Croxford, Diane Kelsall, J Michael Paterson, Peter C Austin, Karen Tu, Lingsong Yun, Janet E Hux

IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE | BMC | Published : 2016

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Evidence on the effectiveness of printed educational messages in contributing to increasing evidence-based clinical practice is contradictory. Nonetheless, these messages flood physician offices, in an attempt to promote treatments that can reduce costs while improving patient outcomes. This study evaluated the ability of printed educational messages to promote the choice of thiazides as the first-line treatment for individuals newly diagnosed with hypertension, a practice supported by good evidence and included in guidelines, and one which could reduce costs to the health care system. METHODS: The study uses a pragmatic, cluster randomized controlled trial (randomized by physici..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research


Funding Acknowledgements

(Canadian Institutes of Health Research, award number 724180703) The Canadian Institutes of Health Research had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis and interpretation of the data; or in the preparation, review or approval of the manuscript.