Journal article

Body Mass Index From Early to Late Childhood and Cardiometabolic Measurements at 11 to 12 Years

Kate Lycett, Markus Juonala, Costan G Magnussen, David Norrish, Fiona K Mensah, Richard Liu, Susan A Clifford, John B Carlin, Tim Olds, Richard Saffery, Jessica A Kerr, Sarath Ranganathan, Louise A Baur, Matthew A Sabin, Michael Cheung, Terence Dwyer, Mengjiao Liu, David Burgner, Melissa Wake

Pediatrics | AMER ACAD PEDIATRICS | Published : 2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To examine how overweight and obesity at specific ages and overall BMI growth patterns throughout childhood predict cardiometabolic phenotypes at 11 to 12 years. METHODS: In a population-based sample of 5107 infants, BMI was measured every 2 years between ages 2 to 3 and 10 to 11 years. We identified 5 BMI trajectories using growth curve models. At ages 11 to 12 years, 1811 children completed assessments for metabolic syndrome risk scores, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and carotid intima-media thickness. Multivariable regression models were used to estimate associations, adjusted for potential confounders (eg, age, sex, smoking exposure, and small for gestational age). RES..

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Grants

Awarded by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council (NHRMC)


Awarded by Royal Children's Hospital Foundation


Awarded by National Heart Foundation of Australia (NHF)


Awarded by Financial Markets Foundation for Children


Awarded by NHRMC Early Career Fellowship


Awarded by Honorary NHF Postdoctoral Fellowship


Awarded by NHF Future Leader Fellowship


Awarded by NHRMC


Funding Acknowledgements

Supported to date by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council (NHRMC) (1041352, 1109355), The Royal Children's Hospital Foundation (2014-241), Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI), The University of Melbourne, National Heart Foundation of Australia (NHF) (100660), Financial Markets Foundation for Children (2014-055; 2016-310), and Victorian Deaf Education Institute. Dr Lycett is supported by NHRMC Early Career Fellowship 1091124 and Honorary NHF Postdoctoral Fellowship 101239. Prof Juonala is supported by the Federal Research Grant of Finland to Turku University Hospital, Finnish Foundation for Cardiovascular Research, Juho Vainio Foundation, Sigrid Juselius Foundation, Maud Kuistila Memorial Foundation, Paulo Foundation, and MCRI (Dame Elisabeth Murdoch Fellowship). Dr Magnussen is supported by NHF Future Leader Fellowship 100849. The NHRMC supported Dr Mensah (Career Development Fellowship 1111160), Ms Liu (Postgraduate Scholarship 1114567), Prof Burgner (Senior Research Fellowship 1064629 and Honorary NHF Future Leader Fellowship 100369), and Prof Wake (Principal Research Fellowship 1160906). Research at the MCRI is supported by the Victorian government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. The MCRI administered the research grants for the study and provided infrastructural support (information technology and biospecimen management) to its staff and the study but played no role in the conduct or analysis of the trial. The Department of Social Services played a role in the study design; however, no other funding bodies had a role in the study design and conduct; data collection, management, analysis, and interpretation; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication. In this article, we use unit record data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study is conducted in partnership between the Department of Social Services, Australian Institute of Family Studies, and Australian Bureau of Statistics. The findings and views reported in this article are those of the authors and should not be attributed to the Department of Social Services, Australian Institute of Family Studies, or Australian Bureau of Statistics.