Journal article

Dissecting the intracellular signalling and fate of a DNA nanosensor by super-resolution and quantitative microscopy.

Agata Glab, Alessandro Bertucci, Fabiana Martino, Marcin Wojnilowicz, Alessia Amodio, Mariano Venanzi, Francesco Ricci, Giancarlo Forte, Frank Caruso, Francesca Cavalieri

Nanoscale | Royal Society of Chemistry | Published : 2020

Abstract

DNA nanodevices have been developed as platforms for the manipulation of gene expression, delivery of molecular payloads, and detection of various molecular targets within cells and in other complex biological settings. Despite efforts to translate DNA nanodevices from the test tube (in vitro) to living cells, their intracellular trafficking and functionality remain poorly understood. Herein, quantitative and super-resolution microscopy approaches were employed to track and visualise, with nanometric resolution, the molecular interactions between a synthetic DNA nanosensor and transcription factors in intracellular compartments. Specifically, fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship scheme This work was funded under an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship scheme (F. Cavalieri FT140100873) and an Establishment Grant by The University of Melbourne (F. Cavalieri, A. Glab). F. Caruso acknowledges the award of a National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Principal Research Fellowship (GNT1135806). This project received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 690901 (NANOSUPREMI). The research was also partly funded by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology (Project No. CE140100036). This work was performed in part at the Materials Characterisation and Fabrication Platform (MCFP) at The University of Melbourne. A. Bertucci acknowledges funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under the Marie Skodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 704120 ("MIRNANO"). A. Amodio acknowledges funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under the Marie Skodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 798565 ("RE-IMMUNE"). G. Forte and F. Martino were supported by the European Social Fund and European Regional Development Fund-Project MAGNET (CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_003/0000492). We acknowledge Marco Savioli for providing help with the fluorescence measurements.