Journal article

Personality disorder increases risk of low quality of life among women with mental state disorders

Bianca E Kavanagh, Amanda L Stuart, Michael Berk, Alyna Turner, Olivia M Dean, Julie A Pasco, Henry J Jackson, Heli Koivumaa-Honkanen, Andrew M Chanen, Lana J Williams

Comprehensive Psychiatry | W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Limited data are available examining the relationship between mental state disorders (mood, anxiety, substance use, eating disorders), their co-occurrence with personality disorder (PD), and quality of life among women. We aimed to investigate these relationships in a sample of women from the community. METHOD: Women from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study (n = 717) were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I/NP and SCID-II) and the World Health Organisation Quality of Life scale (WHOQOL-BREF). Weight and height were measured and lifestyle and demographic factors were self-reported. Logistic regression models (odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals) were..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Awarded by R.D. Wright NHMRC Biomedical Research Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Career Development Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Investigator grant


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: The Geelong Osteoporosis Study is funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (project: 628582). BEK is supported by the Australian Government Research Training Program and an Ian Scott Mental Health PhD Scholarship, Australian Rotary Health. MB is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Senior Principal Research Fellowship (APP1059660 and APP1156072). OMD is supported by a R.D. Wright NHMRC Biomedical Research Fellowship (APP1145634). JAP currently receives funding as a CI for two NHMRC projects (APP1104438 and APP1103242) and HJJ currently receives funding as a CI for three NHMRC projects (1,102,595, 1,128,626, 1,144,022), although these grants are not related to the current study. HK-H is supported by the Paivikki and Sakari Sohlberg Foundation and the Signe and Ane Gyllenberg Foundation. LJWis supported by an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (1064272) and a NHMRC Investigator grant (1174060).