Journal article

GRB7 is an oncogenic driver and potential therapeutic target in oesophageal adenocarcinoma

Jovana R Gotovac, David SH Liu, Michael J Yates, Julia Milne, Arthi A Macpherson, Kaylene J Simpson, Guy D Eslick, Catherine Mitchell, Cuong P Duong, Wayne A Phillips, Nicholas J Clemons

Journal of Pathology | WILEY | Published : 2020

Abstract

Efficacious therapeutic approaches are urgently needed to improve outcomes in patients with oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). However, oncogenic drivers amenable to targeted therapy are limited and their functional characterisation is essential. Among few targeted therapies available, anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) therapy showed only modest benefit for patients with OAC. Herein, we investigated the potential oncogenic role of growth factor receptor bound protein 7 (GRB7), which is reported to be co-amplified with HER2 (ERBB2) in OAC. GRB7 was highly expressed in 15% of OAC tumours, not all of which could be explained by co-amplification with HER2, and was associated wi..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by Department of Health and Human Services acting through the Victorian Cancer Agency, Victoria, Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank the following Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre core facilities: Flow Cytometry, Centre for Advanced Histology and Microscopy, Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics and the ACRF Translational Reverse Phase Protein Array platform. This research was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia Project Grant (#APP1120293 to WAP and NJC) and the Australian Cancer Research Foundation (for the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre Flow Cytometry, Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics, and Translational Proteomics RPPA facilities). JRG was supported by a Melbourne International Research Scholarship (University of Melbourne). DSL was supported by Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) Foundation for Surgery John Loewenthal, Reg Worcester and Eric Bishop Fellowships, Cancer Therapeutics Scholarship (Cancer Therapeutics CRC), and an NHMRC Postgraduate Research Scholarship. NJC is supported by a Fellowship (MCRF16002) from the Department of Health and Human Services acting through the Victorian Cancer Agency, Victoria, Australia.r The Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics (KJS) is funded by the Australian Cancer Research Foundation (ACRF), the Australian Phenomics Network (APN) through funding from the Australian Government's National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) program, the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre Foundation, and the University of Melbourne Research Collaborative Infrastructure Program.